History of the mound builders
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History of the mound builders by Millard Filmore Compton

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Published by Marshall County Bank in Moundsville, W. Va .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • Moundsville (W. Va.),
  • West Virginia.

Subjects:

  • Mound-builders.,
  • Mounds -- West Virginia.,
  • Moundsville (W. Va.) -- Antiquities.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby M.F. Compton (1923).
Classifications
LC ClassificationsE73 .C74
The Physical Object
Pagination19 p.
Number of Pages19
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL6674912M
LC Control Number25004507
OCLC/WorldCa11698650

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Givens' By the Hand of Mormon has pretty solid account of the shift in Smith's vision of Book of Mormon peoples from the Mound Builders to Mesoamerica, but there's no evidence for a Mound Builder setting in the text of the book , 14 August (UTC) The current information is WP:CITEd, you additions are WP:OR and not cited.   The mound builders are a terminology used for a collection of cultures of North America that build a number of earth mounds. Mounds are one of the earliest forms of dead memorials. These earth mounds varied in size and style and were built for religious and ceremonial activities. It is also believed that some of these mounds were used for. The Mound Builders traces the speculation surrounding these monuments and the scientific excavations which uncovered the history and culture of the ancient Americans who built them. The mounds were constructed In Illinois, the one-hundred-foot Cahokia Mound spreads impressively across sixteen acres, and as many as ten thousand more mounds dot /5. MOUND BUILDERS. Mound Builders were prehistoric American Indians, named for their practice of burying their dead in large mounds. Beginning about three thousand years ago, they built extensive earthworks from the Great Lakes down through the Mississippi River Valley and into the Gulf of Mexico region. These mounds, many of which survive today, consisted of several hundred tons of dirt, clay.

According to Gordon Sayre (The Mound Builders and the Imagination of American Antiquity in Jefferson, Bartram, and Chateaubriand), the tales of the origins of the mounds were often based in a. - Archaeology supporting the historicity of the Book of Mormon. See more ideas about Archaeology, Book of mormon and Mound builders pins. Mormons, Mastodons and Mound-Builders Part 1: ORIGIN OF A LEGEND IN the Rev. David Marks was traveling through western New York and there he heard of the recent publication of a very strange book. When Marks heard the claims being made for this book -- that it told the hitherto unpublished story of the ancient inhabitants of the Americas -- it occurred to him that the book, if true, might. It was the myth of the Mound Builders, a lost race of diligent and gifted artisans who had passed across the scene in shadowed prehistory, ultimately to be exterminated by the treacherous, ignorant redskinned savages who even now were causing so much trouble for the Christian settlers of the New World.

  The ancient North American Mound-builder civilizations correlate with the people in The Book of Mormon. They built fortified cities the way those . The Mound Builders traces the speculation surrounding these monuments and the scientific excavations which uncovered the history and culture of the ancient Americans who built them. The mounds were constructed for religious and secular purposes some time between B.C. and A.D., and they have prompted curiosity and speculation from very.   Vogel seeks to understand how the Book of Mormon “fit into the ongoing discussion about the origin and nature of ancient American cultures” (Introduction). His Chapter 4 focuses on the mound-builder myths. He views the Book of Mormon as a product of 19 th Century thought and experience. Mound Builders and Pueblos The first Indian group to build mounds in what is now the United States are often called the Adenans. They began constructing earthen burial sites and fortifications around B.C. Some mounds from that era are in the shape of birds or serpents, andprobably served religious purposes not yet fully understood.